Feb
1
to Jan 30

Two Douglass Exhibits

Frederick Douglass Remembered

Quinnipiac will mark the 200th anniversary of Frederick Douglass’ birth with a series of events to honor his life and his many achievements. One of the high points will be a yearlong exhibition curated by Ireland’s Great Hunger Institute that focuses on the time Douglass spent in Ireland and his enduring relationship with that country.

https://www.qu.edu/on-campus/institutes-centers/irelands-great-hunger-institute/frederick-douglass-remembered.html

Frederick Douglass in Ireland: The Black O'Connell

This exhibition explores the time Douglass spent in Ireland in 1845-1846 and the impact that the country had on his personal and political development. A highlight of his stay was meeting his hero, the Irish nationalist and abolitionist, Daniel O’Connell. It was while speaking in front of O’Connell that Douglass made an impassioned plea for his enslaved people to find their own “Black O’Connell.” Throughout his life, Douglass would playfully refer to himself in this way. Frederick Douglass in Ireland: “The Black O’Connell” will open to the public in the Lender Special Collection Room at the Arnold Bernhard Library on the Mount Carmel Campus on February 2, 2018.

A smaller exhibition, which will feature a stunning statue of Frederick aged 27 (when he visited Ireland) will be on display in the School of Law on the North Haven Campus.

A specially-commissioned booklet, written by Professor Christine Kinealy, will be available for purchase.

Both exhibitions are free and will remain open to the public for a year. For group visits, including school trips, please contact ighi@qu.edu.

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Jun
22
to Dec 31

Exhibit: Frederick Douglass, Agitator

  • American Writers Museum (map)
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“Agitate! Agitate! Agitate!” is a quote from activist Frederick Douglass who was one of the greatest public speakers in American history, so it’s only fitting that the new exhibit in his honor at the American Writers Museum (AWM) is entitled Frederick Douglass AGITATOR

Opening in the Roberta Rubin Writer’s Room June 22, 2018 – December 31, 2018, this exhibit sponsored by Allstate Insurance Company (Lead Sponsor), Wintrust (Partner Sponsor), and several generous individuals, coincides with Douglass’ bicentennial year and includes related education and public programs.

Frederick Douglass AGITATOR highlights excerpts from his speeches and writings, some recorded by students from Young Chicago Authors. Other excerpts include Douglass’ speech on Haiti at the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition and The Reason Why pamphlet he and Ida B. Wells distributed to protest African-American exclusion from the fair.

https://portside.org/2018-06-24/author-and-orator-frederick-douglass-be-honored-new-special-exhibit-american-writers

Tickets to the museum are $12 for adults, $8 for seniors and students, and free for children ages 12 and under. Museum hours are Tuesday – Sunday 10 AM – 5 PM, Thursdays 10 AM- 6 PM. For more information visit www.americanwritersmuseum.org or call 312-374-8790

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Jun
24
to Dec 30

Douglass Bicentennial African American Experience Tour

  • Colonial Tours of Annapolis (map)
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Colonial Tours of Annapolis is offering its new “African American Experience in Annapolis” walking tour every Sunday. Discover what life was like for all classes of African Americans in Annapolis, Anne Arundel County and Maryland from the colony’s founding in 1632 until the present day. The tour also shares Annapolis links to Frederick Douglass.

https://www.annapolis.com/venue/colonial-tours-of-annapolis/

Exterior stops along the two-hour tour include: Banneker-Douglass Museum, Maynard Burgess House, William Butler House, Historic Annapolis Museum, Kunta Kinte Memorial and story wall, sites along Fleet and East Streets, Chase-Lloyd House, Hammond-Harwood House and the Thurgood Marshall Memorial.

Tours are offered Thursdays Fridays and Saturdays throughout the Summer. Check out the website for more information and to buy your ticket. http://www.colonialtoursannapolis.com

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Oct
24
to Nov 25

Play: The Agitators (Frederick Douglass and Susan B. Anthony)

  • Mosaic Theater at Atlas Performing Arts Center (map)
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A Play by Mat Smart

http://www.mosaictheater.org/announcing-season-four

This brilliant play examines the 45-year friendship and occasional rivalry between two great, rebellious, and flawed American icons: Susan B. Anthony and Frederick Douglas. Young abolitionists when they met in Rochester in the 1840s, they were full of hopes, dreams and a common purpose. As they grew to become the cultural icons we know today, their movements collided and their friendship was severely tested. This is the story of that 45-year friendship - from its beginning in Rochester, through a Civil War and to the highest halls of government. They agitated the nation, they agitated each other and, in doing so, they helped shape the Constitution and the course of American history.A loving and faithful portrait of two historical figures, Mat Smart’s story also brims with modern urgency and relevance.  

“A brilliant success in illuminating the rights of American citizenship —not to be missed. The Agitators faithfully demonstrates the demarcation line of wills that brought these two forces of nature together, when race and gender issues, equality and voting rights, were being forged in the wake of slavery and the Civil War.”-Rochester Democrat & Chronicle

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Oct
11
to Oct 13

Frederick Douglass across and against Times, Places, and Disciplines Conference, Paris France

Frederick Douglass across and against Times, Places, and Disciplines

11-13 octobre 2018, Paris

Appel à contributions

In an article entitled “Frederick Douglass, Refugee,” published in the Atlantic in February 2017, historian David Blight argued that “[o]ne place to begin to understand our long history with the controversies over immigration is with Douglass.” In his 2015 The Strangers Book: The Human of African American Literature, American Literature scholar Lloyd Pratt insisted on Douglass’s engagement with the figure of the stranger, his inhabitation of the stranger persona as a tool to build up a polis and found a demos on what Pratt calls “stranger-with-ness.” This conference, organized on the occasion of the bicentennial of Douglass’s birth, proposes to reconsider Douglass’s practice and “art of estrangement” (Giles) broadly understood as spatial and temporal displacement and philosophical, epistemological and disciplinary decentering.

2018 will mark the bicentennial of Frederick Douglass’s birth. The wide array of events and activities already planned testifies to Douglass’s relevance to present debates in the United States and other countries. Frederick Douglass Family Initiatives (FDFI)’s “One Million Abolitionists” plans to print one million copies of the Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: An American Slave for distribution in schools as well as the creation of projects addressing present social justice issues. In 2018, the National Park Service (NPS) will organize public and educational programs at the Frederick Douglass National Historic Site (NHS) in Washington, D.C. Likewise, the bicentennial conference that will be held in Paris in 2018 will be an opportunity to reexamine the figure of Frederick Douglass across times, places, and disciplines. It encourages contributions that read Douglass’s writings—not his serial autobiographies and speeches only, but also his antebellum journalism, his letters, his (rare) poetry and his one foray into fiction—as well as his life beyond the familiar chronological and geographical boundaries. It thereby hopes to contribute to revisiting the heuristic coordinates of Douglass’s scholarship.

The purpose of this conference, however, is not to commemorate Douglass as a solitary, exceptional figure, but rather to consider him in relation to his contemporaries and to his world, as one voice, powerful though it was, among others. Douglass collaborated with and opposed other black and white intellectuals, activists, artists and politicians. He was a man involved in the conflicts and ruptures of his time, in the United States and beyond. His authority and centrality also must be re-examined.

Panels or individual papers may address, but are not limited to, the following topics:

Reading Douglass across and against times

-Reading Douglass reading his time as a “witness and participant” but also as a promoter of anachrony used as a political tool to “repeat history in order to deform it” (Castronovo).
-Reading Douglass’s writings “against 1865,” against the “before-after narrative of emancipation” (Hager and Marrs), in the hope of complexifying our interpretation of Douglass’s use of the genre of the slave narrative;
-Reading Douglass’s “lives” beyond the chronology of Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass (Levine), in particular his ambivalent career as a diplomat (Bourhis-Mariotti), a Republican appointee, and an activist in the 1890s.
-Douglass and radical democracy and activism: considering Douglass’s role in a larger history of abolitionism understood as “a radical, interracial movement, one which addressed the entrenched problems of exploitation and disenfranchisement in a liberal democracy and anticipated debates over race, labor and empire” (Sinha).
-Douglass’s engagement with an ecological antislavery logics (Ellis).
-Re-reading Douglass’s reception. Reading Douglass within an enlarged canon of African American writing (White & Drexler; Hager) in conjunction with other North American slave narratives and early African American fiction, history and journalism (William Wells Brown, Harriet Jacobs etc.). How does
this enlarged canon affect Douglass’s critical reception and his status today as the greatest black pre-Civil war author?
-Reading Douglass today so as to open new perspectives on the interplay between history, memory and activism at play in Douglass’s and our times.
-Douglass and the discourse of liberation, human rights and humanitarianism; Douglass’s practice of a stranger humanism based on mutually acknowledged and always evolving differences (Pratt).
-Reconsidering Douglass and public history: What aspects of present debates are illuminated by Douglass’s words (Davis)? Why teach Douglass today?


• Reading Douglass across and against spaces

-Changing the maps and geographical coordinates that have shaped our understanding of Douglass. Using Martha Schoolman’s “abolitionist geographies,” for example, which include both the local and the circum-atlantic, invites us to explore imaginative routes for Douglass’s legacy, from Canada to Rome and London to Haiti and Liberia, via the more expected yet still understudied Afro-Caribbean geopolitical spaces (Nwankwo).
-Reexamining issues of mobility and displacement in Douglass’s life; Douglass as an American and international figure; Douglass and transnationalism; Douglass and the Americas (Hooker); Douglass and France (how The North Star covered the 1848 Revolution, for example [Fagan, Alimi-Levy]); Douglass and the diasporic self.
-Translating Douglass across languages and spaces
-Investigating the different spaces of Douglass’s life and work; Douglass’s “public body” (Fanuzzi); Douglass’s “feminine space” (Fought).
-Decentering our reading of Douglass may lead us to complicate the genealogy of his writing beyond the racial divide and find other significant intertextualities—not only the “Founding Fathers,” the New England Transcendentalists, his contemporaries Hawthorne and Melville (Otter and Levine) and Harriet Beecher Stowe, but also his Black Atlantic peers (Giles) and a broader intellectual tradition from the political thought of John Stuart Mill to the transatlantic print culture of the time.

• Reading Douglass across and against disciplines

Douglass wrote at a moment when “modern academic fields were becoming increasingly defined” but his writing cut across disciplinary boundaries (Lee). To be considered:
-Douglass’s use of fiction or of the tools of fiction in his journalism, in his speeches;
-Douglass’s “rhetorical legacy” (John R. Kaufman-McKivigan);
-Douglass’s role as an editor (Meer)
-Douglass and book history: questioning the vision of Douglass and his African-American peers as autonomous author-artisans in the sphere of print, free of white abolitionist control in the pre-Civil War period (Roy)
-Douglass’s philosophy or philosophies (Lee);
-Douglass’s “visual affirmations” of himself (Wexler) as well as his celebration of photography “as a great democratic art” (Stauffer, Trodd, & Bernier); Douglass as a celebrity; Douglass and the media.

We plan to organize activities before and after the conference in relation to community-based teaching, performances and public readings.

For more information contact:
DouglassParis2018@gmail.com
 

The Conference Committee:
Claire Bourhis-Mariotti, Université Paris 8
Agnès Derail, ENS
Hélène Le Dantec-Lowry, Université Sorbonne Nouvelle
Claire Parfait, Université Paris 13
Hélène Quanquin, Université Sorbonne Nouvelle
Marie-Jeanne Rossignol, Université Paris Diderot
Cécile Roudeau, Université Paris Diderot
Michaël Roy, Université Paris-Nanterre

Keynote speakers (confirmed): Leigh Fought (Le Moyne College), Lloyd Pratt (University of Oxford), Michaël Roy (Université Paris Nanterre).

References:
ALIMI-LEVY, Yohanna. L’Amérique face aux révolutions françaises de 1830 et 1848. Presses de l’Université Paris Sorbonne, forthcoming in 2017.
BLIGHT, David. “Frederick Douglass, Refugee,” The Atlantic, Feb. 2017.
BOURHIS-MARIOTTI, Claire. L’union fait la force. Les Noirs américains et Haïti, 1804-1893. Presses universitaires de Rennes, 2015.
CASTRONOVO, Russ. Fathering the Nation: American Genealogies of Slavery and Freedom, U. of California Press, 1995.
DAVIS, Angela Y., editor. Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, An American Slave, Written by Himself: A New Critical Edition, City Lights, 2009.
ELLIS, Cristin. “Amoral Abolitionism: Frederick Douglass and the Environmental Case against Slavery,” American Literature, vol. 86, no.2, June 2014, pp. 275-303.
FAGAN, Benjamin. “The North Star and the Atlantic 1848,” African American Review, vol. 47, no. 1, June 2014, pp. 51-67.
FANUZZI, Robert. Abolition’s Public Sphere, U. of Minnesota P., 2003.
FOUGHT, Leigh. Women in the Life of Frederick Douglass, Oxford UP, 2017.
GATES, Henry Louis, Jr. and John STAUFFER, editors. The Portable Frederick Douglass, Penguin Classics, 2016.
HAGER, Christopher. Word by Word. Emancipation and the Act of Writing, Harvard University Press, 2013
HAGER, Christopher and Cody MARRS. “Against 1865: Reperiodizing the Nineteenth-Century,” J19: The Journal of Nineteenth-Century Americanists, vol. 1, no. 2, Fall 2013, pp. 259-284.
GILES, Paul. “Douglass’s Black Atlantic: Britain, Europe, Egypt.” The Cambridge Companion to Frederick Douglass, edited by M. Lee, CUP, 2009.
HOOKER, Juliet. Theorizing Race in the Americas. Douglass, Sarmiento, Du Bois, Vasconcelos, OUP, 2017.
LEE, Maurice, editor. The Cambridge Companion to Frederick Douglass, CUP, 2009.
–, Slavery, Philosophy, and American Literature, 1830-1860, CUP, 2005.
LEVINE, Robert and Samuel OTTER. Frederick Douglass and Herman Melville: Essays in Relation, U. of North Carolina Press, 2008.
LEVINE, Robert. The Lives of Frederick Douglass, Harvard UP, 2016.
MEER, Sarah. “Douglass as Orator and Editor” The Cambridge Companion to Frederick Douglass, edited by M. Lee, CUP, 2009.
NWANKWO, Ifeoma C. K. “Douglass’s Black Atlantic: The Caribbean,” The Cambridge Companion to Frederick Douglass, edited by M. Lee, CUP, 2009.
PRATT, Lloyd. The Strangers Book: The Human of African American Literature, University of Pennsylvania Press, 2015.
RICE, Alan J. and Martin CRAWFORD, editors. Liberating Sojourn: Frederick Douglass & Transatlantic Reform, University of Georgia Press, 1999.
ROY, Michaël. Textes fugitifs. Le récit d’esclave au prisme de l’histoire du livre, ENS Éditions, coll. « Métamorphoses du livre », forthcoming in 2017.
SCHOOLMAN, Martha. Abolitionist Geographies, U. of Minnesota P., 2014.
SINHA, Manisha. The Slave’s Cause: A History of Abolition, Yale UP, 2016.
SPECQ, François. De l’esclavage en Amérique. Frederick Douglass. Henry David Thoreau, Editions Rue d’Ulm, coll. “Versions françaises,” 2006.
STAUFFER, John, TRODD Zoe, and Céleste-Marie BERNIER. Picturing Frederick Douglass: An Illustrated Biography of the Nineteenth Century’s Most Photographed American, Liveright, 2015.
SWEENEY, Fionnghuala. Frederick Douglass and the Atlantic World. Liverpool UP, 2007.
WEXLER, Laura. “‘Rightly Viewed:’ Theorizations of Self in Frederick Douglass’s Lectures on Pictures,” Pictures and Progress: Early Photography and the Making of African American Identity, edited by Maurice Wallace and Shawn Michelle Smith, Duke University Press, 2012.
WHITE, Edward and Michael DREXLER. Beyond Douglass: New Perspectives on Early African-American Literature, Bucknell University Press, 2008.
WILSON, Ivy G. “On Native Ground, Transnationalism, Douglass, and the ‘Heroic Slave’.” PMLA 121.2 (2006): 453-68.

http://saesfrance.org/11-13-octobre-2018-paris-frederick-douglass-across-and-against-times-places-and-disciplines/

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Sep
22
8:00 PM20:00

Ira Knight, Frederick Douglass

  • Full Frame Theater at the Power Plant (map)
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IRA KNIGHT PRESENTS:

Love Letters, A Guide
and
Frederick Douglass, An Interpretation

2 Original Plays in 1 Night from the leader in Bridge and Mirror theater in America!

http://www.iraknight.org/


FREDERICK DOUGLASS:
A unique and inspiring interpretation of one of the greatest human beings to ever walk the planet Earth! This is NOT an impersonation or mimic show, but creative and inspiring art that you won’t see elsewhere.

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Sep
22
10:00 AM10:00

Frederick Douglass Day

Time: TBD

Location: Downtown Easton

FREE

Guest speaker: Dr. Spencer Crew, Robinson Professor of History, George Mason University and Assitant Curator at Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture. Food and Retail Vendors, Knowledge Village, Children's Village. Sponsored by Frederick Douglass Honor Society in Partnership with the Talbot County Free Library and the Town of Easton

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Aug
30
9:00 AM09:00

Mapping Frederick Douglass in Rochester

Frederick Douglass’ Rochester: Mapping His Tracks in Our City Exhibit

http://events.democratandchronicle.com/rochester_ny/events/frederick-douglass-roch-/E0-001-111601860-7@2018083000

Thursday

Aug 30, 2018 – All Day

(weekly on Thursdays for 29 times)

More Info: (585) 428-8370 or www.cityofrochester.gov/FrederickDouglass200.

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Aug
5
11:00 AM11:00

Frederick Douglass Academy High School Reunion Cookout

Welcome to the Frederick Douglass Academy High School Reunion Cookout! The cookout will be held at Kenneth Hahn Park in the Blue Lagoon Area on August 5, 2018 from 11am to 4pm. Tickets are $10 to RSVP. This cost covers rental of space and activities. We hope to foster a space to strengthen our community, network with one another, and simply enjoy each other's company while reminiscing on our time at FDAHS. Please join us! We hope to see as many of our classmates there as possible!

https://www.eventbrite.com/e/frederick-douglass-academy-high-school-reunion-cookout-tickets-47576327075

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Jul
31
to Aug 3

Tubman and Douglass Freedom Trail Tour

BBH Tours Presents: 

Tour: HARRIET TUBMAN HOME, * FREDERICK DOUGLASS SITES, NIAGARA FALLS

NATIONAL WOMEN’S HALL OF FAME  *   SENECA NIAGARA FALLS RESORT & CASINO

Includes: Roundtrip Luxury Motorcoach Transportation

Admission to MAID OF THE MIST CRUISE

3 Days, 2 Nights Stay at Seneca Niagara Falls Resort & Casino

1 Night Stay @ Hilton Garden Inn, Auburn, NY w/complimentary Breakfast

$100 FREE SLOT PLAY, $40 Food Coupon

$625.00 pp, D/O.  Deposit Required: $175.00 Balance Due: July 10, 2018 * NO REFUNDS!!!

July 31-August 3, 2018

 HOST: Lou Fields  RESERVE YOUR SEAT: 443.983.7974…. Email: bbhtours@gmail.com

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Jul
27
8:00 PM20:00

Frederick Douglass NOW

Artist-educators Roger Guenveur Smith and Lula Washington celebrate the bicentennial of pioneering abolitionist and feminist Frederick Douglass in an electric evening of solo movement and performance featuring percussionist Marcus Miller. Douglass’ classic 19th-century texts inspire a radically remixed vision of the present American moment.

http://www.grandperformances.org/frederick-douglass-now

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Jul
27
10:00 AM10:00

Frederick Douglass Youth Conference

In commemoration of the life and legacy of Frederick Douglass, BDM , in partnership with RETAP Baltimore, present the Frederick Douglass Youth Conference. Participants will explore innovative approaches to real world issues relevant to African American youth through the exchange of ideas and experiences amongst peers. Additionally, participants will engage in discussions on college and career readiness, STEM focused education, and much more. This conference is a unique opportunity for youth to celebrate the life and legacy of Frederick Douglass while preparing them to become active and engaged members of an ever-changing global society. Lunch will be provided!

For more information and to register: 

http://visitannapolis.org/events/6132

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Jul
24
6:30 PM18:30

Frederick Douglass Bicentennial Exhibit Comes to Brockton

Join The Brockton Public Library in the Driscoll Gallery at 304 Main Street as we unveil the Douglass Bicentennial Exhibit and present the "North Star" award to benefactor Eastern Bank Foundation for their support of our Immigration Dialogue Series.  We will also enjoy a musical presentation and light refreshments.  Free

http://www.brockton.ma.us/information/Events/2018/07/24/default-calendar/frederick-douglass-exhibit-opening

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Jul
18
7:00 PM19:00

Frederick Douglass in Bristol

  • New Room, Horsefair Entrance, John Wesley's Chapel (map)
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Bristol.jpg

In the summer of 1846 the famous American abolitionist Frederick Douglass took to the stage of the Victoria Rooms in Bristol, enthralling his thousands-strong audience with vivid denunciations of slavery. He was feted by the mayor and received great support from the people of the city, maintaining friendships with many of those he met for the rest of his life.

Douglass biographer Laurence Fenton will discuss the background to and details of the great abolitionist’s visit to Bristol in a talk at the New Room. He will pay particular attention to John and Mary Estlin, the anti-slavery activists at whose Park Street home Douglass stayed. He will also ask if it is time Douglass’s visit to the city was marked more formally with a commemorative plaque or statue.

Laurence Fenton is an Irish writer and historian. He has published widely on Frederick Douglass, including, most recently, ‘I Was Transformed’ Frederick Douglass: An American Slave in Victorian Britain (Amberley, 2018).

https://www.brh.org.uk/site/events/the-lion-of-the-occasion-frederick-douglass-in-bristol/

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Jul
18
6:30 PM18:30

Conner Prairie Celebrates Frederick Douglass's Bicentennial

n celebration of Frederick Douglass' bicentennial celebration year, Conner Prairie and Asante Children's Theatre will reprise More Light: Douglass Returns. This full-length play by Celeste Williams was inspired by Frederick Douglass' historic return to Indiana in 1880. A series of events will be held throughout July to celebrate Douglass' bicentennial.

The month of events kicks off with a public event at Noblesville Square from 6-7:15 p.m. on Tuesday, July 10. The event will include a short scene from the play and a book giveaway to youth of Douglass' autobiography reissued for his bicentennial and part of the "One Million Abolitionists" project by the Frederick Douglass Family Initiative.

"It's our mission to give voice to important pieces of history so our community can learn from them for the future," said Catherine Hughes, director of museum theatre and research at Conner Prairie. "We're excited to reprise the previously untold story of Frederick Douglass' return to Indiana, especially during the bicentennial celebration year."

Kenneth B. Morris, Jr., great-great-great grandson of Frederick Douglass and great-great grandson of Booker T. Washington, will discuss the project at Conner Prairie from 6:30-8 p.m. on Wednesday, July 18. In addition to the community conversation, attendees will see a scene from More Light and be part of a book giveaway.

The play connects to the local history of the Roberts Settlement, the first mixed-race settlement in Hamilton County, and will be performed at the following times. All performances will take place in the Lilly Theater at the Conner Prairie Welcome Center. Advance tickets are available at a discounted rate of $5 for guests and $4 for members. Tickets may also be purchased in person (subject to availability) for $7 for guests and $6 for members.

  • 7 p.m. on Thursday, July 12
  • 3 p.m. on Saturday, July 14
  • 7 p.m. on Sunday, July 15
  • 7 p.m. on Thursday, July 19
  • 3 p.m. on Saturday, July 21
  • 7 p.m. on Sunday, July 22

The play, which is supported by the Christel DeHaan Family Foundation, is part of Conner Prairie and Asante Children's Theatre's Giving Voice Initiative, which was created to tell untold stories and focuses on the African-American presence in Indiana history.

Visit connerprairie.org/MoreLight for tickets and more information

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Jul
14
10:00 AM10:00

Frederick Douglass Bicentennial Gospel Brunch

Historic Annapolis will host a Gospel Brunch on Saturday, July 14, at the William Paca House and Garden, 186 Prince George Street, from 10 am-12 pm. The highlight of the brunch will be a performance by the Extensions of Faith Praise Choir.

The event is part of the year-long celebration of the bicentennial of Frederick Douglass’  birthday. In October 1864, Maryland passed a new Constitution that banned slavery.  Barely a fortnight had passed after the ratification of Maryland’s “Free Constitution” when Frederick Douglass returned to his home state. As he walked down the aisle of the Bethel AME Church in Baltimore the choir jubilantly sang “Home, Sweet Home!” What better way to celebrate the life of Frederick Douglass than to hear the Extensions of Faith Praise Choir singing the same hymn.

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Jul
9
7:00 PM19:00

Chautauqua: Seeking Justice with Frederick Douglass

CHAUTAUQUA 2018: SEEKING JUSTICE, WITH FREDERICK DOUGLASS

Maryland Humanities is hosting its 24th annual Chautauqua living history series this summer. The first performance features abolitionist Frederick Douglass as part of Maryland’s bicentennial of Douglass’s birth.

http://events.baltimoremagazine.com/event/chautauqua_2018_seeking_justice_with_frederick_douglass#.W0u-gXGhfIV

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Jul
9
to Sep 9

Frederick Douglass Exhibition

  • Gallery North, Northumbria University (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

Work by St Pauls Church of England Primary School – representations of Frederick Douglass. On February 26, 2018, Linda Wright, the Lord Mayor of Newcastle upon Tyne, unveiled a plaque at 5, Summerhill Grove.

https://getnorth2018.com/inspired-by/frederick-douglass-exhibition/

The plaque commemorated the visits to the city of Frederick Douglass, the most famous African American abolitionist of the mid-19th Century and a tireless campaigner for social justice on both sides of the Atlantic.

The plaque also recognised that Douglass was just one of many fugitive slaves who came to Newcastle in the 19th Century, many of whom also stayed at 5, Summerhill Grove with the Richardson family — Henry, his wife Anna and sister Ellen. The Richardsons were Quaker activists at the heart of a vibrant abolitionist movement on Tyneside that reflected strong radical and progressive political traditions in the area.

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Jul
5
7:00 PM19:00

Chautauqua Living History Series

GarrettCollChautauqua.jpg

The 24th annual Chautauqua Living History series will take place in the Garrett College auditorium July 5

Douglass will be portrayed by Bill Grimmette, a living history interpreter, storyteller, actor and motivational speaker who has appeared as Martin Luther King, Jr., W.E.B. DuBois and Benjamin Banneker. He has performed at Chautauquas in Maryland, Colorado and South Carolina.

https://www.wvnews.com/garrettrepublican/news/glaf-md-humanities-to-present-th-annual-chautauqua-living-history/article_0df25a31-10ec-5af1-a858-8e4706508cba.html

 

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Jul
4
12:00 PM12:00

Celebrating Freedom and American Giants

This Independence Day, community members are invited to celebrate the birth of our nation at a free, family-friendly concert in Lions Wayside Park.

The 20th annual event will take place from noon to 1:30 p.m. and is produced by two local nonprofits, Pleasanton Community Concert Band and CelebratingJuly4.org. Attendees are invited to bring picnics to the park at 4401 First St.

While the permanent title of the annual event is "Celebrating Freedom and its Evolution since the Revolution," this year’s theme is "American Giants: Bernstein, Douglass, and Baseball."

"This year's program came together last fall when an alumni magazine mentioned some significant anniversaries happening in 2018, including Leonard Bernstein's centennial and Frederick Douglass' bicentennial," said Bob Williams, conductor of the community band. "Both of these men were giants in their chosen fields, and selecting music and words to place them in the context of evolution of America’s freedom was very easy."

https://pleasantonweekly.com/news/2018/06/25/pleasantons-20th-annual-fourth-of-july-celebration

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Jul
4
12:00 PM12:00

Reading Frederick Douglass Together

As part of its July 4 celebration, the town of Carrboro is holding its fifth annual community reading of Frederick Douglass’ famed antislavery speech “The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro.” Everyone’s invited to the Century Center from noon to 1:30 for the reading; UNC professor William Sturkey will deliver opening remarks.

https://chapelboro.com/town-square/news-around-town-june-11-chapel-hill-carrboro-hillsborough

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Jul
4
11:00 AM11:00

Reading Frederick Douglass Together

Reading Frederick Douglass Together — With Costumed Civil Rights Activists & Discussion

http://freedomsway.org/event/reading-frederick-douglass/

Considered one of the most daring, eloquent speeches in the English language, Frederick Douglass’s fiery 1852 speech, “What to the Slave is the 4th of July?” challenges its audience, then and now, to consider the meaning of freedom, citizenship and patriotism.

Our event begins with a dramatic reading of the Declaration of Independence by Minute Man National Historic Park re-enactor Jim Hollister to set the background for Douglass’s speech.  A representative of the Indigenous Americans sovereignty movement will give an introduction in the Narragansett language, accompanied by a drummer from the Pequot nation.

A participatory community reading of Douglass’ speech is then accompanied by costumed readers voicing different eras of civil rights activism, including:

  • 1860s Civil Rights activist and Robbins House resident Ellen Garrison
  • The 1960s Civil Rights movement
  • 1970s Black Power movement
  • The Current Black Lives Matter movement

Our event ends with a moderated audience discussion with historians. Sponsored by MassHumanities.

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Jul
3
12:00 PM12:00

Reading Frederick Douglass Together

  • Strawberry Banke Museum Visitors Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

One of the 19th century’s most famous speeches, “What to the Slaves is the Fourth of July?” given by Frederick Douglass in 1852 will get a public reading again this year, the 200th anniversary of his birth. Douglass, one of our nation’s greatest orators and abolitionists, was asked to speak at an event commemorating the signing of the Declaration of Independence. In his provocative speech, Douglass said, “This Fourth of July is yours, not mine. You may rejoice, I must mourn.” And he asked, “Do you mean, citizens, to mock me, by asking me to speak to-day?” JerriAnne Boggis, executive director of the Black Heritage Trail of New Hampshire, a sponsor of the event with Strawbery Banke, says, “We are honored to be celebrating this great American orator with this community reading of one of his most fiery speeches ... a speech that, given the happenings in our country today, rings just as true today as it did in 1865.” Community members are invited to take turns reading portions of the speech.

What: Public reading of Frederick Douglass’ speech “What To The Slaves is the Fourth of July?”

When: Noon, Tuesday, July 3

Where: Strawbery Banke Museum Visitor’s Center, Portsmouth

Admission: Free

More info: Public invited to listen and participate in the reading.

 

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Jul
3
12:00 PM12:00

Copy of Reading Frederick Douglass Together

  • Strawberry Banke Museum Visitors Center (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

One of the 19th century’s most famous speeches, “What to the Slaves is the Fourth of July?” given by Frederick Douglass in 1852 will get a public reading again this year, the 200th anniversary of his birth. Douglass, one of our nation’s greatest orators and abolitionists, was asked to speak at an event commemorating the signing of the Declaration of Independence. In his provocative speech, Douglass said, “This Fourth of July is yours, not mine. You may rejoice, I must mourn.” And he asked, “Do you mean, citizens, to mock me, by asking me to speak to-day?” JerriAnne Boggis, executive director of the Black Heritage Trail of New Hampshire, a sponsor of the event with Strawbery Banke, says, “We are honored to be celebrating this great American orator with this community reading of one of his most fiery speeches ... a speech that, given the happenings in our country today, rings just as true today as it did in 1865.” Community members are invited to take turns reading portions of the speech.

What: Public reading of Frederick Douglass’ speech “What To The Slaves is the Fourth of July?”

When: Noon, Tuesday, July 3

Where: Strawbery Banke Museum Visitor’s Center, Portsmouth

Admission: Free

More info: Public invited to listen and participate in the reading.

 

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Jul
1
7:00 PM19:00

Frederick Douglass NOW

  • National Museum of African American History and Culture (map)
  • Google Calendar ICS

July programs at the Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture open with a performance by Roger Guenveur Smith in his one-man theater piece Frederick Douglass Now. The script, written by the Obie Award-winning actor, draws on some of the most powerful speeches delivered by Douglass.

Busy as an actor in television and feature films, Smith played the title role in the 2017 release of Rodney King, a one-man theater piece written by Smith and directed by Spike Lee. The performance of Frederick Douglass Now will take place Sunday, July 1, at 7 p.m. in the museum’s Oprah Winfrey Theater. Admission is free, but registration is required at www.etix.com.

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Jul
1
11:30 AM11:30

Reading Frederick Douglass Together

RFDT Jamaica VT.jpg

 

Join us as we read together the fiery July 5, 1852 speech in which the great abolitionist orator Frederick Douglass took exception to being asked to commemorate the signing of the Declaration of Independence. This is a participatory event. Community members are invited to witness and/or join in the reading. Copies of the speech will be provided.

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Jul
1
11:00 AM11:00

Reading Frederick Douglass Together

NEWBURYPORT – The First Religious Society Unitarian Universalist and the Museum of Old Newbury will host a community reading of Frederick Douglass's impassioned 1852 speech, “The Meaning of the Fourth of July for the Negro” on Sunday, July 1 at 11 a.m. at 26 Pleasant St.

http://www.newburyportnews.com/news/local_news/frederick-douglass-event-slated-for-sunday-in-newburyport/article_361a3406-8893-510d-b6c9-efe9aa0a3c6c.html

This is the first time this program has been offered in Newburyport, and it celebrates the bicentennial of Douglass’ birth. For the July 1 event, readers from the community will orate the Douglass speech. This event, made possible through a grant from Mass Humanities, is public and open to all.

A brief discussion following the declamation will be led by humanities scholar and historian William F. Quigley, Jr., a teacher of history at The Governor’s Academy in Byfield. During his 25 years at the academy, he has served as head of the history department, dean of academics and dean of faculty/assistant head of school. Quigley is founding director of the Academy’s Writing Center, and is author of the recent book, Pure Heart. Light refreshments will be served.

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Jun
29
7:30 PM19:30

Frederick Douglass NOW

Two sets from GRAMMY Award-winning saxophonist Branford Marsalis will bookend Roger Guenveur Smith's one man show, Frederick Douglass Now

Frederick Douglass Now was inspired by the bicentennial of the dynamic abolitionist and pioneering feminist Frederick Douglass (1818-1895). The multidisciplinary performance incorporates elements of slam poetry, rap, and revival minister to recast the words of the runaway slave-turned-abolitionist into a 21st century context and "makes a striking statement about where America has come and still has to go in terms of race." (LA Times).

https://www.tdf.org/shows/16750/Frederick-Douglass-NOW

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